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Barcode .Number 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

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029 767 690 8 
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 



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029 767 691 

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

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029 767 692 1 

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

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029 767 693 3 



3ox iNumber 



2m 




Total of 
Volumes 



'?3 



Call .Number 



//A 



3 



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ALL THINGS IN ORDER 



A Manual of Filing anJ Indexing for Ministers 



by 



GLENN C. TOMPKINS 



Copyright 19S0 by Glenn C. Tsmpkint 



4^ 
4 




1 




To SKETCH in a few words a recognizable 
picture of as many-sided a genius as my 
father, Melvil Dewey, is no easy task. Merely 
to list the major interests with which he 
was actively concerned, giving a single 
sentence to each, would take too much 
space, yet their very number and import- 
ance and diversity is a significant measure 
of the man. 

Before he was 25 years old, he had 
developed and published the first edition of 
the Decimal Classification, had established 
the Library Journal, and had been the 
most dynamic factor in the founding of 3 
national organizations — the American Li- 
brary Association, the Spelling Reform As- 
sociation, and the Metric Bureau (Lj, March 
15, 1951, n.457). Before he was 40, the 
mid point or his life span, he had established 
the Library Bureau, which in addition to 
its primary function, brought into general 
use for the first time such today universal 
labor savers as the card index, vertical file, 
and loose-leaf binder; had created at Co- 
lumbia University the first Library School 
and transferred it to Albany as the New 
York State Library School; had become 
Secretary of the Regents of the University 
of the State of New York, in charge of all 
higher education in the State, and had put 
thru the Legislature a revision and con- 
solidation of the education laws of the State 
which affected the Regents; and was at 



Dewey 



1851-1951 

GODFREY DEWEY 

Lake Placid Club, N. Y. 

the same time Director of the State Li- 
brary, the State Library School, and the 
new Home Education (today we would 
say Adult Education) Department which 
he had created. Within 10 years more he 
had received from the 1900 Paris Exposi- 
tion, three of the very few Grands Prix 
awarded to this country — one for his Li- 
brary Exhibit, one for his Home Education 
Exhibit, and one to himself personally; iind 
had created and guided thru its early years 
the institution which for the last 25 years 
of his life was to become the focus of his 
immense energies— the world-famous Lake 
Placid Club. 

To summarize briefly the outstanding 
personal characteristics of an individual as 
original and forceful as Melvil Dewey, is 
hardly less difficult, and brief statements 
must often read like a series of contradic- 
tions, for the contradictions were there. 

My father had a rare gift of inspiring 
intense and lasting loyalties on the part of 
his associates and co-workers and even 
among more casual contacts. Yet, thruout 
most of his life, he was rarely without a 
harassing number of enemies. Some few of 
these represented hostility to the scnipulous 
integrity which he maintained in his of- 
ficial positions. More, probably, resulted 
from occasional failures in tact or patience. 
Still more, however, undoubtedly derived 
from the driving energy which was his most 



Reprinted from Libhaby Jouhnal, December 1, 1951 



X-2- 



1^ 



CENTENNIAL DINNER 

observing the 

lOOth ANNIVERSARY 

of the birth of 

MELVIL DEWEY 



1851 



Lake Placid Club 

Saturday, December 8. 1951 
7 p. m. 



195/ 




■Z 720' 
.VI 



-^^MeM Dewei/ eeutemial Weekend 



at Cake Placid eiub 



-Eie lOOth anniversary of the birth of Melvil Dewey, the originator of the Decimal 
Clas«ficat.on System used in hbraries thruout the world and a pioneer Tg^^Tt 
the library fie d as well as m the field of simplified speUing and calendar refom^cu^s 
on December 10. The occasion will be given special observance at the Lake Sid Club 
m the Adirondacks which Melvil Dewey founded in 1895 

The week-end activities will begin with a Tea-of -Welcome on Saturday after- 
noon, December 8. A full afternoon and evening of entertainment ^^ll iSe a 
Concert an Anniversary dinner and a program which will feature tributes to MdvS 
Dewey by representatives of associations affiliated with his major interest 

A commemorative service in the Club chapel will be held Sunday morning to be 
followed in the afternoon and evening by a tea and a program of LS recorded 
music and the traditional Club song service followed by an organ reSal 
An,nn!'^^°^'^"' ^'"^ include appropriate ceremonies on Monday, December 10 
Among the various groups which have expressed a special interest in Xe end 
program are the Amencan Library Association the New Ynrt qV, J t k ^^^^^^^ 
Amherst College where Melvil 'Sewey onginated l^:^ 

Cla^ificatton, the Library of Congress, Columbia University Librar^ School 
Spelling Reform group and the New York State Board of Regentl Tis antS™t.d 
that various workers in these fields will be interested in am-nr^na A ^"^"^f^^^'^ 

MELVIL DEWEY — 1 851-1 951 



Melvil Dewey, whose many-sided genius 
left Its mark on so many fields of human 
endeavor, was born December 10, 1851, In 
Adams Center, a small community' In 
northwestern New York State. He died 
at Lake Placid Club in Florida on December 
26, 1931, soon after his eightieth birthday. 
From earliest boyhood his life was one of 
intense and varied activity. Long before 
It ended he had been accorded International 
recognition for his achievements In var- 
ious fields, principally that of education, 
library system and spelling reform. 

Many believe that Melvil Dewey's most 
lasting claim to fame will rest on his orig- 
ination of the Dewey System of Decimal 
Classification which Is now In wide use In 
libraries thruout the world. In view of 
the great prestige which the system now 
enjoys It Is somewhat startling to note 
that Dewey conceived the Idea In all Its 
fundamentals at the age of twenty-one, 
while still an undergraduate at Amherst 
College. Reduced to Its simplest terms. 
Decimal Classification Is merely the em- 
ployment of the Arabic numerals 1 thru 
9 to set up divisions and sub-dlvlslons 
within which all branches of man's written 
knowledge may be encompassed. 

D.C. CALLED LASTING ACHIEVEMENT 
Referring to the system after the death 



of Its originator In 1931, Dr. Ernest Cush- 
Ing Richardson of Princeton University 
had this to say: "The D. C. Is a concrete 
achievement. It has already contributed 
hundreds of centuries of working time to 
research, higher learning and common 
knowledge and so long as It does last, will 
contribute centuries annually to the prime 
factors of human enjoyment and progress " 
The New York Tlmei took note of Melvil 
Dewey's death In a long editorial In lu 
Issue of December 28, 1931, from which 
the following excerpt Is taken: 
025.4 D51 

"An appropriate epitaph for the late 
Melvil Dewey would be the above no- 
tation used In his library decimal classi- 
fication system to identify his book. It 
would suggest the outstanding contri- 
bution of his eager and wide-ranging 
mind . . . Millions and millions (of 
books) bear his decimal brand and he 
will no doubt share, both In public and 
private libraries, the immortality of 
works In prose and verse whose place 
on the shelves he has permanently de- 
creed." 

From Amherst, where he remained as 
acting librarian for two years after grad- 
uatlon, Melvil Dewey went to Boston. This 
was In 1876 and the period between that 




lOOth ANNIVERSARY 

of the birth 0/ MELVIL DEWEY 

1851 - 1951 








-Ah-"} 

/ / A summary of 

World English Spelling 

The English language is simple in grammar and cosmo- 
politan in vocabulary; uniquely suitable for international 
use. English spelling is today almost unbelievably irregular 
and confusing; a major factor in illiteracy, and the chief 
obstacle to the rapid spread of English as a world language. 

How bad is the present conventional English spelling? 
The first letter of the alfabet, a, is pronounst at least 8 
different ways (not counting silent a, as in dead) in : quota at 
are any make image what walk. The 26 letters of the alfabet 
are pronounst an average of over 4 ways, counting muteness 
(every letter of the alfabet is sometimes silent). The name 
sound of this first letter, a, is speld at least 18 different ways 
in: make maelstrom main gaol gauge may prayed re great 
matinee eh veil weigh weighed ballet they conveyed 
bouquet. The 40 sounds commonly distinguisht are speld 
an average of over 12 ways apiece! 

World English Spelling offers substantially one spelling for 
each sound, one pronunciation for each spelling. It accom- 
plishes tliis result with — 

1) No new letters; 

2) No diacritics (which, in effect, create new letters, for 
typing and printing) ; 

3) As little disturbance of familiar forms and usages as 
practicable. 

World English Spelling is the outcome of long study and 
large experience by the Spelling Reform Association and the 
Simplified Spelling Board, now merged in the Simpler 
Spelling Association, in the United States; the Simplified 
Spelling Society, in Great Britain; and the Committee on 
World Literacy and Christian Literature, working in many 
countries thruout the world. It is used, with very minor 
variations, in the publications of all three of these cooperating 
organizations. 



BRIGHTON PUBLIC ART GALLERIES 



CHURCH STREET. BRIGHTON 




3 '^JlJLIt 



EXHIBITION 
OF WORKS 

BY MEMBERS OF THE 
ST. IVES SOCIETY OF 
ARTISTS 

FROM MAY 21st 
TO JULY 10th, 1932 



CATALOGUE 



THREEPENCE 



A.1039 



iMlittliliaiii 



x-z 

MARYLAND 



A Selection of Books 
for General Reading 




"In this State, whoM finest tradition is tolerance, 
intellectual gianta and big-souled men and women 
originated notable principles of government and 
new ideals of human society." — Gilbert Grosvenor 



* * * 



ENOCH PRATT FREE LIBRARY 

Baltimore's Public Librari 



1933